Shin-ichi Fukuda


Saturday, April 7, 2018  7:30 pm
St. Mark’s Lutheran Church  $45/$55

One of Japan’s premier guitarists, Shin-ichi Fukuda is internationally known as an intelligent and brilliant interpreter of the contemporary guitar.

Shin-ichi Fukuda started playing the classical guitar at the age of eleven under Tatsuya Saitoh (1942–2006). In 1977 he moved to Paris and continued his music training at the Ecole Normale de la Musique, under Alberto Ponce, continuing his studies at the Accademia Chigiana in Siena with a scholarship, under Oscar Ghiglia during 1980–1984.

After his diplomas in Paris and Siena, Fukuda was awarded many important competition prizes, including first prize in the 23rd Paris International Guitar Competition, organised by Radio France. Since then, for more than thirty years, he has pursued a brilliant concert carrier as a leading guitarist, performing solo recitals, concertos with orchestra, and chamber music in major cities around the world.

Fukuda is also a highly gifted and enthusiastic teacher and has trained many pupils who have gone on to gain the highest honours; these include the young Japanese guitarists, Kaori Muraji, Daisuke Suzuki and Yasuji Ohagi, among others. He is a guest professor at Shanghai Conservatory (China), Osaka College of Music and Hiroshimaʼs Elisabeth University of Music and the Showa Music University.

The distinguished Cuban composer Leo Brouwer dedicated to him his Concerto de Requiem – In memoriam Takemitsu II for guitar and orchestra. Fukuda was awarded the Japanese government 2011 Art Encouragement Music Prize and has more than eighty recordings to his credit.

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Shin-ichi Fukuda

BUY TICKETSSaturday, April 7, 2018  7:30 pm
St. Mark’s Lutheran Church  $45/$55

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